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Advantage II Vs Advantage Multi for Dogs and Cats

Advantage II Vs Advantage Multi

What’s the Difference Between the Advantages?

advantage-II-vs-multi

Finding a safe, effective flea treatment is hard enough without needing to compare different types of the same brand name!

We’re going to compare the 2 of them, Advantage II and Advantage Multi, for you so that you know the difference and can choose the product that’s best for your pet!

Both flea drops last for about 30 days before they need to be reapplied and both are waterproof.

What Do They Do?

Let’s start with Advantage II because it’s available without a prescription. It has two active ingredients: imidacloprid and pyriproxyfen. Imidacloprid is a neurotoxin that kills adult fleas and lice (not ticks) by causing hyper-excitability, paralysis, then death. It’s mildly toxic to other pets and to people.

Pyriproxyfen is and insect growth regulator that prevents larvae from developing into mature adult insects. It’s completely non-toxic to humans.

Advantage Multi also has imidacloprid but its second active ingredient is significantly different. Moxidectin protects against heartworms, roundworms, hookworms and ear mites. It acts as a neurotoxin to them much like imidacloprid acts on insects. It protects your animal from heartworms by killing them while they’re still young and in the blood stream.

Conclusion

As you can see, there are two primary differences between Advantage II and Advantage Multi.

  1. Advantage Multi actually protects against heartworms and intestinal worms as well as fleas.
  2. Advantage Multi is only available by prescription and Advantage II is available over-the-counter.

You can buy Advantage Multi from the internet but you really need to have your pet tested for heartworms prior to starting it, so a trip to the vet is necessary regardless.

If you need a heartworm medicine as well as flea protection, go with Advantage Multi. If you just need flea protection, click here to find a great deal on Advantage II.

If you’ve used either Advantage Multi or Advantage II, please tell us about your experience in the comments section below.



5 Responses to “Advantage II Vs Advantage Multi”
  1. Sue says:

    Perhaps someone already asked this and I missed it, sorry if that’s the case.
    My question is : why is it ok to put this stuff on our animals but not us? I’ve seen directions that say to use rubber gloves when doing it. Makes no sense

    Reply
    • Monique says:

      I would love to know this as well.

      Reply
    • Chris says:

      What do you recommend then? We have used advantage multi for years on 6 cats and never had any issues. Just don’t let them lick it while it’s drying and there shouldn’t be any issues. I’ve gotten it on my hands many times while fighting a cat to put it on. Skin contact isn’t going to kill you. Yes it’s poison but it’s such a small amount. We have battle fleas for a long while and at first we tried all these stupid natural ways of getting rid of them etc….. But those don’t work and if they do even a little bit you have to redo it every single day. I mean I guess if a person doesn’t mind fighting to get rid of fleas on a daily basis so be it but I get satisfaction when I apply the advantage and within 20 min I see fleas just falling off.

      Reply
  2. dinghy says:

    Imidacloprid is toxic to people. It causes a short circuit in the nerve synapses. n large quantities, it can be quite toxic but in small amounts – like incidental contact during application where you don’t wear gloves – it is relatively harmless. UNLESS IT CAUSES AN ALLERGIC REACTION.

    Reply
    • Drew says:

      and it DOESN’T harm the pet??????????? yes, it DOES harm them also!!!!!!

      Reply
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